Magnesium Deficiency Symptoms Explained: Do You Show Any Of These?

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Vitamins and minerals are essential to good health. They help build tissues and bones, transport and regulate our hormones, allow us to fight off infections and strengthen our immune systems. When we have a vitamin or mineral deficiency, it plays havoc with our bodies and our health. And the mineral magnesium is no exception.

What does magnesium do?

Every organ in your body needs magnesium. It contributes to the formation of your teeth and bones, helps activate essential enzymes, regulates blood calcium levels, aids in the production of energy and regulates other essential nutrients such as zinc, copper, potassium and vitamin D. Our hearts, kidneys and muscles all require magnesium as well.

Foods high in magnesium include nuts, whole grains and green leafy vegetables, but it is difficult to get enough magnesium from dietary sources. Even when you do get enough magnesium from your diet, many things can deplete your body of this essential mineral. These include a viral illness that causes diarrhea or vomiting, irritable bowel syndrome, diabetes, hyperthyroidism, pancreatitis and kidney disease. Stress, menstrual periods and excessive use of coffee, salt, alcohol and soda can also deplete your magnesium stores.

Magnesium deficiency symptoms explained

A magnesium deficiency can present itself with very specific symptoms. If you are experiencing any of these, a lack of magnesium may be the cause.

Depression - A study by the George Eby Research Institute reported at Science.NaturalNews.com (1) posits that a magnesium deficiency can cause neurological dysfunction and “neuronal injury” in the brain, which can lead to depression. Studies from as early as 1921 support this conclusion. A more recent clinical trial, conducted in 2008, proved that magnesiumwas as effective as antidepressants in treating diabetic patients with depression, without any of the harsh side effects of drug treatments.
Restless leg syndrome - Restless leg syndrome has only recently been recognized by the medical community, but those who suffer from it know that it has always been all too real. The condition causes a feeling of jitteriness and muscle tension in the legs, and sometimes the arms as well. The feeling is usually described as a constant, irresistible need to move the affected limb. Since the symptoms are usually worse at night, it can make sleep nearly impossible.

Abnormal heart rhythms - Also known as palpitations, abnormal heart rhythms are often experienced as a “flip flop” sensation in the chest or a feeling of the heart skipping a beat. The frightening sensation can last for just a few seconds or for a minute or more. According to an article published by the University of Maryland Medical Center (2), women with the highest level of dietary magnesium had the lowest risk of cardiac death. Men with an increased magnesium intake had a lower incidence of coronary heart disease. Intravenous magnesium, the article continues, is used in hospitals to reduce the chances of cardiac arrhythmias and atrial fibrillation.

Muscle spasms - Anyone who has had a Charlie Horse knows how painful muscle spasms can be. A deficiency in magnesium can cause muscles anywhere in the body to spasm when under tension — as when reaching for something, standing or even sneezing. Ironically, the muscles can also spasm when they have been at rest. This can cause sufferers to have frightening muscle spasms in the middle of the night which can often only be relieved by standing or walking.
Migraine headaches - An article, “Headache, Migraine – In-Depth Report,” posted by The New York Times (3), cites magnesium supplementation as a non-drug treatment for migraines. Some studies, the article states, have shown a link between a magnesium deficiency and an increased risk for migraines, especially with patients who have migraines associated with their menstrual cycle. Magnesium is also known to relax blood vessels, and many headaches, according to the article, are caused by “muscle contraction and uneven blood flow.” Anything that helps address these problems is likely to help with migraines.

 

Supplementation

If you are experiencing any of these symptoms, you may want to consider taking a quality, high-end form of magnesium. The recommended minimum daily intake is, according to National Institutes of Health Fact Sheet (4), 400 to 420 mg for healthy men over the age of 18, 360 mg for adult women who are still menstruating, and 320 mg for post-menopausal women, although it varies with developmental stages and factors such as pregnancy and lactating. Because the balance of calcium and magnesium in your body can affect your heart, if you are being treated for heart disease, check with your doctor before taking magnesium supplements.

Source:

1) http://science.naturalnews.com

2) http://umm.edu

3) http://www.nytimes.com

4) http://ods.od.nih.gov

Learn more: http://www.naturalnews.com/046058_magnesium_deficiency_symptoms_nutritional_supplements.html#ixzz37qk4NTA4

Single Tick Bite Can Pack Double Pathogen Punch

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Reported by Science Daily, June 20th, 2014

Although I appreciate the many articles about Lyme disease published by Science Daily, I always find myself thinking that they didn’t publish accurately, or the article didn’t delve deep enough.  For this particular article, I feel they fell short as there is  no mention of other common co-infections such as Bartonella Henselae, otherwise known as Cat Scratch Fever, Ehrlichiosis, Chlamydia Pneumoniae, Tularemia, Rocky Mountain Spotted Fever, etc….Co-infections are often the reason why many with Lyme disease cannot get well.  If you want to learn more about Co-infections, please visit my page “What is Lyme Disease”.

The new research, published online today in the journal PLOS ONE, was conducted by scientists at Bard College, Sarah Lawrence College, and the Cary Institute of Ecosystem Studies.

“We found that ticks are almost twice as likely to be infected with two pathogens — the bacterium that causes Lyme disease and the protozoan that causes babesiosis — than we would have expected,” said Felicia Keesing, a professor of biology at Bard College, Adjunct Scientist at the Cary Institute, and co-author of the paper. “That means health care providers and the public need to be particularly alert to the possibility of multiple infections coming from the same tick bite.”

Almost 30 percent of the ticks were infected with the agent of Lyme disease. One-third of these were also infected with at least one other pathogen. The agents of Lyme disease and babesiosis were found together in 7 percent of ticks.

The researchers collected thousands of blacklegged ticks from over 150 sites in Dutchess County, New York, an area with high incidence of tick-borne illnesses. They also collected ticks that had fed on different kinds of wildlife, including birds, rodents, opossums, and raccoons. Ticks acquire pathogens from feeding on infected hosts. DNA from each tick was extracted and tested for the presence of several pathogens.

“Mice and chipmunks are critical reservoirs for these two pathogens, so ticks that have fed on these animals are much more likely to be co-infected,” said Michelle Hersh, an assistant professor of biology at Sarah Lawrence College, past postdoctoral researcher at the Cary Institute, and lead author of the study.

“Mice and other small mammals are often particularly abundant in habitats that have been fragmented or degraded by human activity,” said Richard Ostfeld of the Cary Institute of Ecosystem Studies. “That means these patterns of co-infection might get worse through time as humans continue to impact forest ecosystems.”

The researchers also considered another emerging pathogen, Anaplasma phagocytophilum, the bacterium that causes anaplasmosis in humans. Fortunately, ticks were not more likely than expected to be co-infected with Anaplasma and the Lyme disease bacterium.

The researchers determined the proportion of ticks infected with each pathogen individually, then calculated the rates of co-infection expected by chance alone. Not only was co-infection with the agents of Lyme disease and babesiosis greater than expected, but rates of triple infection with the agents of Lyme, babesiosis, and anaplasmosis were about twice as likely as expected. “People in tick-infested parts of the United States such as the Northeast, Mid-Atlantic, and Upper Midwest, are vulnerable to being exposed to two or three diseases from a single tick bite,” said Keesing. “And, of course, that risk increases when they’re bitten by more than one tick.”

 

 

 

 

Quit Bugging Me!

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Tips on Coping with Bug Bites this Summer

Warmer weather has folks venturing outdoors, and while the risk of running into a snake, bear or other menacing animal exists, the critters far more likely to be encountered in the great outdoors are ticks, mosquitoes and other insects.

A lot of bugs pack a powerful bite or sting.

Janyce Sanford, M.D., chair of the University of Alabama at Birmingham Department of Emergency Medicine, recommends an insect repellant with DEET, along with long pants and long-sleeved shirts, as the best way to ward off most pesky insects. DEET with a concentration of 10 to 30 percent is approved for use on children ages 2 months and older. Ten percent DEET will last about two hours, and 24 percent DEET lasts around five hours.

Ticks in Alabama are known to carry the bacterium that causes Rocky Mountain spotted fever; but the likelihood of getting Lyme disease from a local tick bite is low in this region, according to Sanford. Rocky Mountain spotted fever is characterized by a flulike illness, followed by a red, raised rash on the wrists or ankles. The best way to remove a tick, says Sanford, is to use tweezers and pull straight up in an easy motion.

“One of the biggest outdoor risks is bee or wasp stings, especially for those with severe allergic reactions,” Sanford said. “A severe allergic reaction, known as anaphylaxis, can be fatal.”

She recommends carrying an epinephrine auto-injector, commonly known as an EpiPen, when camping or hiking, especially if anyone in the group has ever reacted badly to previous stings. EpiPens require a prescription from a physician and can be purchased at a drugstore.

Sanford says a good first-aid kit is a must for anyone planning on spending time outdoors. Ready-made kits are available at outdoor stores, or they can be assembled from materials on hand. Include assorted bandages and basic medicines such as Tylenol, Benadryl and aspirin. Albuterol will help those with group members who have asthma or COPD. Include a 1 percent hydrocortisone anti-itch cream, foldable splints, alcohol wipes and cleaning agents.

Sanford advises planning before heading to the woods or mountains. Research the destination, and know what to expect. Be aware of the strengths and weaknesses of your group. Who has allergies? Who knows CPR? Are there any special needs to be considered?

Proper clothing, rain gear, plenty of water and emergency food supplies will help keep an unexpected event from turning your outdoor vacation into a hospital visit.

“Common sense and a little thought before you venture out will help make your outdoor adventure one to remember fondly,” said Sanford.


Story Source:

The above story is based on materials provided by University of Alabama at Birmingham. The original article was written by Bob Shepard. Note: Materials may be edited for content and length.

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Body Ecology is a leader in Fermented Food and Nutrition with a heavy emphasis on Digestive Health

CocoBiotic 1250mL

As most people with Lyme disease know,  75-80% of our immune system lives in the digestive tract.  Digestive health is also tied to the endocrine, circulatory and central nervous systems.  We also know that taking antibiotics wipes out the bad and good bacteria that is needed for healthy digestive function.  This is why we take Probiotics.  It is difficult to know which ones to take, how many strains we need and how many capsules or tablets to take.  Most people with Lyme disease  suffer with compromised digestive health, endocrine health, circulatory health and central nervous health.   In my opinion, working on digestive health is a must.

Body Ecology offers a Super-Healthy & Delicious Probiotic & Prebiotic Fermented Liquid from Young Coconuts called CocoBiotic that will:

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This premier beverage in the Body Ecology Probiotic line CocoBiotic combines the best of both worlds. A naturally-fermented drink made from wild-crafted, young green coconuts… plus a savvy blend of synergistic Probiotics.
The gut-friendly bacteria and yeasts in this delicious beverage are derived entirely from nature… from organically-certified plant sources. CocoBiotic is created from wild-crafted young Thai coconut and utilizes Grainfields proprietary FermFlora natural organic fermentation process.

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CocoBiotic

CocoBiotic 1250mL